Course Schedule (I will provide students with specific assigned readings prior to the class sessions where we will discuss them.)

Weeks 1, 2, and 3: Unit 1—Politics and Revolutions

This unit will begin with a formal, 60-70 minute lecture that reviews the historical context and current state of scholarship on the Reformation, the English Civil Wars, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution. We will also read, hold class discussions, and undertake creative classroom activities about the lives and works of writers including John Milton, Thomas Hobbes, and Margaret Cavendish, among others. Instructor will give mini lectures (approximately 20 minutes) introducing each of the writers that students will read and discuss as well as reviewing key terms and concepts associated with each writer. Copies of all lectures and accompanying presentations will be distributed to students. The reflection essay for this unit is due on 2/5/19.

 

Weeks 4 and 5: Unit 2—The Enlightenment

This unit will begin with a formal, 60-70 minute lecture that reviews the historical context and current state of scholarship on the Enlightenment, the history of science, state politics, and neoclassical aesthetics and poetics. We will also read, hold class discussions, and undertake creative classroom activities about lives and works of writers including Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, and Jonathan Swift, among others. Instructor will give mini lectures (approximately 20 minutes) introducing each of the writers that students will read and discuss as well as reviewing key terms and concepts associated with each writer. Copies of all lectures and accompanying presentations will be distributed to students. The reflection essay for this unit is due on 2/14/19.

 

Weeks 5, 6, and 7: Unit 3—Romanticism

This unit will begin with a formal, 60-70 minute lecture that reviews the historical context and current state of scholarship on the Romantic era, the sublime, the sister arts, the rise of individualism, the French Revolution, and the history of the idea of nature. We will also read, hold class discussions, and undertake creative classroom activities about lives and works of writers including Immanuel Kant, David Hartley, and the poets known as “the Big 6,” among others. Instructor will give mini lectures (approximately 20 minutes) introducing each of the writers that students will read and discuss as well as reviewing key terms and concepts associated with each writer. Copies of all lectures and accompanying presentations will be distributed to students. Exam #1 will follow this unit on 2/28/19, and test material covered in the lecture, discussions, and class activities for Units 1, 2, and 3. The reflection essay for this unit will is due on 3/12/19.

 

Weeks 8 and 9: Unit 4—The Rise of the Middle and Working Class

This unit will begin with a formal, 60-70 minute lecture that reviews the historical context and current state of scholarship on the Victorian period, the history of industrialism, work and poverty in both rural and urban geographies, the rise of a global, colonial economy, and the cultural, literary, and historical factors characterized the rise of the middle class. We will also read, hold class discussions, and undertake creative classroom activities about lives and works of writers including Stephen Duck, Thomas Carlyle, and Charles Dickens, among others. Instructor will give mini lectures (approximately 20 minutes) introducing each of the writers that students will read and discuss as well as reviewing key terms and concepts associated with each writer. Copies of all lectures and accompanying presentations will be distributed to students. The reflection essay for this unit is due on 3/28/19.

 

Weeks 10 and 11: Unit 5—Gender, Marriage, and Sexuality

This unit will begin with a formal, 60-70 minute lecture that reviews the historical context and current state of scholarship on feminism in the “long eighteenth century,” the legal structure of marriage in the period, the rise of women writers, and the representation of sexuality. We will also read, hold class discussions, and undertake creative classroom activities about the lives and works of writers including Eliza Haywood, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Jane Austen, among others. Instructor will give mini lectures (approximately 20 minutes) introducing each of the writers that students will read and discuss as well as reviewing key terms and concepts associated with each writer. Copies of all lectures and accompanying presentations will be distributed to students. The reflection essay for this unit will be due on 4/11/19.

 

Weeks 12, 13, and 14: Unit 6—Colonialism and Slavery

This unit will begin with a formal, 60-70 minute lecture that reviews the historical context and current state of scholarship on the global economy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the transatlantic slave trade, the history of abolitionist movements, slave narratives, and the key terms and concepts related to the rise of nationalism, empire, and colonialism. We will also read, hold class discussions, and undertake creative classroom activities about the lives and works of writers including Thomas Jefferson, Phyllis Wheatley, Mary Prince, Olaudah Equiano, and Ottobah Cugoano, among others. Instructor will give mini lectures (approximately 20 minutes) introducing each of the writers that students will read and discuss as well as reviewing key terms and concepts associated with each writer. Copies of all lectures and accompanying presentations will be distributed to students. Exam #2 will follow this unit on 4/25/19, and test material covered in the lecture, discussions, and class activities for Units 4, 5, and 6. The reflection essay for this unit will be due on 4/25/19.

 

Final Exam Week:Final Projects and their flyers will be due in a show-and-tell presentation held during the course’s final exam period.

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