Week 1 (Th 8/31): Introductions & Review of Syllabus

  • Catherine Gallagher, “The Rise of Fictionality”

Week 2 (Th 9/7): Fictionality & The Rise of the Novel

  • Watt, The Rise of the Novel (excerpt: “Realism and the Novel Form,” 9-34) available on PILOT
  • Seager, The Rise of the Novel (excerpt: “Restructuring,” 46-65) available on PILOT
  • Nielsen, “Ten Theses About Fictionality” (available through library’s databases)
  • Dawson, “Ten Theses Against Fictionality” (available through library’s databases)

Week 3 (Th 9/14): The Castle of Otranto, Romance, Fact, and Fiction

  • Walpole, The Castle of Otranto
  • Novel Definitions: #19 (93-94); #26 (110-114); #38 (142-144)
  • Genette, et al. “Fictional Narrative, Factual Narrative” (available through library’s database)
  • Davis, Factual Fictions (excerpt: “Introduction,” 1-10 & “The Romance,” 25-41) available on PILOT
  • Presentation: Matt Garrett and Ben Wiechmann

Week 4 (Th 9/21): The Female Quixote and Novels’ Truths

Please complete the following readings, but instead of meeting as a class to discuss these texts, we’ll all attend a conversation with Eli Clare in 015 Dunbar Library. Please take half an hour to review Clare’s work (available on PILOT,and also around the web) and prepare a question for our conversation. We’ll add this week’s readings to our conversations next week.

  • Lennox, The Female Quixote (-192)
  • Novel Definitions: #43 (157-161); #50/part 1 (171-172); #95 (273-274)
  • Hunter, Before Novels (excerpt: “Readers Reading,” 61-88) available on PILOT
  • Opportunity: Attend a public conversation with Shayna McConville (Cultural Arts Manager for the City of Kettering, co-organizer of Dayton Pecha Kucha, and writer for the Dayton City Paper) about employment opportunities for English majors (9/19, 12:30-1:50, 015 Dunbar Library).

Week 5 (Th 9/28): The Female Quixote and the Novel’s Logics

  • Lennox, The Female Quixote (- end)
  • Novel Definitions: #79 (235-238); #80 (239-240); #88 (258-259)
  • Rifaterre, Fictional Truth (excerpt: “Fictionality Declared,” 29-52) available on PILOT
  • Armstrong, Desire and Domestic Fiction (excerpt: “Introduction,” 3-23) available on PILOT
  • Presentation: Dan Schack and Erin Sherrets

Week 6 (Th 10/5): Pamela – As IF!

  • Richardson, Pamela (1-169)
  • Novel Definitions: #34 (132-133); #78 (234-235); #93 (268-271)
  • Vaihinger, The Philosophy of ‘As if’ (excerpt: TBD) available on PILOT
  • Warner, Licensing Entertainment (excerpt: “The Pamela Media Event,” (176-232) available on PILOT

Week 7 (Th 10/12): Pamela’s Story, Pamela’s Discourse

  • Richardson, Pamela (-353)
  • Novel Definitions: #24 (107-109); #40 (148-152); #54 (181-182)
  • Cohn, The Distinction of Fiction (excerpt: “Signposts of Fictionality,” (109-131) available on PILOT
  • McKeon, Origins of the Novel (excerpt: “Naïve Empiricism and Extreme Skepticism” & “Romance, Antiromance, True History,” 45-64) available on PILOT
  • Presentation: Andrew Hurst

Week 8 (10/19): Oroonoko’s Worlds

  • Behn, Oroonoko
  • Novel Definitions: #18 (90-92); #41 (152-154); #46 (165)
  • Doležel, “Possible Worlds” (available through library’s database)
  • Doyle, Freedom’s Empire (excerpt: “Entering Atlantic History,” 97-117) available on PILOT
  • Opportunity: attend a public conversation with Karen Maner (Communications & Project Manager, Culture Works) about employment opportunities for English majors (10/17, 12:30-1:50, Oelman 125).
  • Presentation: MacKenzie Hamilton and Reilly Dixon

Week 9 (Th 10/26): Lake presenting @Becoming Media (Use class time to begin research on theoretical key terms/sources for essay and prepare next week’s readings.)

Week 10 (Th 11/2): Sense and Sensibility and Unspeakability

  • Austen, Sense and Sensibility
  • Novel Definitions: #20 (94-96); #28 (116-119); #31 (122-124)
  • Banfield, Unspeakable Sentences (excerpt: “Historical Development of Narrative Style,” 225-256) available on PILOT
  • Gallagher, Nobody’s Story (excerpt: “Introduction,” xiii-xxiv) available on PILOT
  • Presentation: Sarah Hamic and Jessica Becker

Week 11 (Th 11/9): Lake presenting @SLSA (Use class time to begin drafting final essay and prepare next week’s readings.)

Week 12 (Th 11/16): Roxana’s Intentions

  • Defoe, Roxana
  • Novel Definitions: #81 (240-241); #86 (249-251); #91 (263-266)
  • Currie, The Nature of Fiction (excerpt: “Interpretation,” 99-126) available on PILOT
  • Richetti, Popular Fiction Before Richardson (excerpt: “Rogues and Whores,” 23-59) available on PILOT
  • Presentation: Tina Luiggi

Week 13: Th 11/23: Thanksgiving Break

Week 14 (Th 11/30): Final Essay Workshops
Complete drafts of final essays due for those who presented in Weeks 3, 5, and 7 by M 11/27 at 5pm via email as Word attachments to crystal.lake@wright.edu and will be sent to everyone by 10am on T 11/28. Please come to class prepared to discuss you peers’ essays.

Week 15 (12/7): Final Essay Workshops
Complete drafts of final essays due for those who presented in Weeks 8, 10, and 12 by M 12/4 at 5pm via email as Word attachments to crystal.lake@wright.edu and will be sent to everyone by 10am on T 12/5. Please come to class prepared to discuss you peers’ essays.

Final exam period: Final essays due via email as Word documents (please include your last name and the word “final” in your file name) by W 12/13 at 8pm.

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